Category Archives: Writing

Supernova Part 4

Standard

Jim Rivers, a navigator, now finds himself leading the crew of the Valiant Explorer.  He has awakened everyone on board and held a conference with all the section leaders to detail the situation – their ship veered off course and has brought them into a strange solar system that is going supernova – in 3 days.  They cannot outrun it.  While everyone is shocked, a few voices of reason prevail – giving the team a possible plan to survive the explosion. 

They have decided to salvage usable parts from the ship and forge enough trinite to seal the connection points between as many modules as possible, in effect creating one very long spacecraft.   A memorial service was given for the captain and his first in command who died when a fire damaged their pods.

See the link at the top of the page for the full Supernova story.  Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

2 Poems

Standard

To See the Sea Again

I’ll see the big old trees again

and walk along the sand.

I’ll smell the fresh sea breeze

and then,

I’ll be walking hand in hand Read the rest of this entry

Supernova Part 2

Standard

When last we left navigator Jim Rivers, he had come out of his frozen sleep on board the Valiant Explorer. The Valiant is a self-contained top of the line excavation and processing facility. Massive in size and purpose, it mines (among other things) the new and valuable metal Trinite.

————————–

Jim stirred.  The darkness was made of ice. Fits of shivering left little warmth and instinctively he clenched into a ball trying to conserve body heat. His mind tried to make sense of the sensory input and was failing. Soon he would have to open his eyes and find out why he was in such distress but he didn’t want to – he wanted to go back to sleep and dream. He tried to imagine sparkling clear ocean waves crashing overhead as he scuba dived on a coral reef. But no, the water was cold and the rock was hard. Another bout of shivering rattled his head against the floor and caused him to wince.  Enough. Read the rest of this entry

Cheesy Party Bread

Standard

(Garnish, Wise, Politics)

Dear Dorothy, December 1, 1948

I was glad to get your letter in the post. It was forwarded to us by the state department. You will notice that the return post on mine is Paris, France. Yes, my dear Paul has been stationed here for four years, four years! I shall love every minute of it, do you hear? Paris! Read the rest of this entry

The Christmas Box

Standard

As published in “The Valdosta Magazine,”  Winter 2010.

The Christmas Box by Monique Nagel

Early on Christmas morning my family gathered around the tree my stepfather had cut down, decorated with ornaments that we kids had used our entire lives.  Our home was decorated with popcorn garlands, lights, construction paper chains, and cards everywhere.  The entire Holiday Season was spent with Jingle Bells frolicking on the radio and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer flying across the television.  We played UNO at the kitchen table and laughed until we cried.  My mother and stepfather were the glue that held this happy whirlwind together. Read the rest of this entry

Leave it in Beaver III

Standard

George stood over June’s body, looking down.  He was still angry, and still wanted to hurt her but the kid had gone and called the police; it was time to leave if he ever intended to get out.  The evening darkness would hide their escape.  It would be hard to get Geoffrey to go, but there really was no choice was there?  Already Geoffrey was holding his head and rocking back and forth, like he had done as a child.  Now there’s a blast from the past, thought George.  There was a time when Geoffrey had been very familiar with that position. Read the rest of this entry

Leave it in Beaver, Part II

Standard

Since many of you have requested that I further this story, I’m going to give it a try.  I will add to it in installments, until it ends or we all get tired of it.  Here we go, and thank you all for encouraging me!

(Continued from the post “Leave it in Beaver”)

June’s apron is a little messy now, but that’s alright she won’t be needing it anymore. No more chopping or cooking, vacuuming or washing clothes. She won’t have any more reason to be mad at me for tracking dirt into the house from the garden; or for watching mean tv shows like CSI and Hill Street Blues. She wants to watch baby shows like Gilligan’s Island and Lost in Space reruns over and over while she eats chocolates one by one from the box. She always offers me one, but I know her game, she’ll snatch it away at the last second and laugh while she pops it into her mouth. Read the rest of this entry